Manage your Bintray and GitHub organizations better together

Bintray’s integration with GitHub is now moving to a new level with GitHub organizations! As a Bintray user who is also a GitHub user, you already know that you can import your GitHub repositories, tags, readme’s, and release notes to Bintray. Now you can also import your GitHub organizations, the organization’s repositories, and even keep your GitHub and Bintray organization’s members in sync! This new feature saves time and effort maintaining your organizations and their members across the two platforms.

Here’s how to do that:

Authorize your GitHub account in Bintray

In order to be able to import GitHub entities to Bintray, your GitHub account should be authorized in Bintray. Your GitHub username has to be provided and authorized in the ‘Accounts’ page in your Bintray profile page:

Authorize Github in Bintray

Grant Bintray access to your GitHub organizations

GitHub organizations should be authorized with Bintray, so Bintray is able to access your GitHub organization. Grant Bintray the access by going to your GitHub profile. Under the ‘Applications’ section you will see the GitHub organization. Select the organizations you would like Bintray to be able to access.

GHOrganizationAccess

You can read more about application authorization with GitHub in the Bintray documentation.

Import a GitHub organization

You can import a GitHub organization while you create a new one in Bintray, or to an existing Bintray organization at any time.

Import GitHub organization to a new Bintray organization

When creating a new organization in Bintray you now see a new option to import your organization from GitHub:

Create new organization

If you choose ‘Import from GitHub’, your GitHub organizations, that have not been imported yet, will be displayed for you to choose from:

Select Organization to Import upon new organization creation

Once you make a selection, your GitHub organization is successfully imported to Bintray. Note that at this point, only the organization is imported, without members or repositories.

At this point Bintray offers you shortcuts to the most common options you naturally wish to do now:

Organization was created successfully

I will elaborate on how to sync members to your imported organization, and how to import an organization repositories later on in this post.

Import GitHub organization to an existing Bintray organization

To associate an existing Bintray organization with a GitHub organization, access the ‘Accounts’ section in your Bintray organization’s profile page. Bintray lets you choose from your accessible GitHub organizations:

Select organization to import to an existing organization

Sync members

Bintray Professional accounts can also sync members from a GitHub organization and have membership changes in a GitHub organization automatically synced to the equivalent Bintray organization. To sync members automatically, click on the ‘Sync’ button in the ‘Members’ section of the organization profile page:

Sync members

The sync will generate an invitation in each member’s Bintray mailbox. Once a user approves his membership, he becomes a fully synced member in the Bintray organization.

The following rules apply once your GitHub organization is imported:

  • All GitHub organization members will be members in the corresponding Bintray organization (as long as they are users of both).
  • GitHub teams are now teams in the corresponding Bintray organization.
  • Members’ permissions are also imported: an ‘owner’ in a GitHub organization will be an ‘admin’ in Bintray, a ‘member’ in GitHub stays a ‘member’ in Bintray.
  • Member’s privacy attributes, ‘private’ and ‘public’ in GitHub, are kept as ‘public’ and ‘nonpublic’ in Bintray .

You can keep the members list synced with Github, so any member added to or removed from GitHub in the future will automatically be updated in your Bintray organization. This saves you the worry of maintaining members in both Bintray and GitHub. You can also disable member sync, so that it is a onetime procedure. Members’ syncing can be enabled or disabled at any time.
For a step by step instructions of how to import GitHub organizations and members, please refer to the user manual.

Import a repository

At this point it makes sense to add a repository to your new organization. Importing GitHub organization repositories is now available! (previously, it was only possible to import personal repositories). In order to do so, create a new repository under your imported organization. In the repository page, click on ‘Import from GitHub’:

Repository page import from GitHub
Bintray will display all the GitHub repositories and their release tags under the imported organization:

Import GitHub repositories

Select the repositories and releases you wish to import, and remember that GitHub repositories will be Bintray packages, and GitHub release tags will be versions in Bintray. Note that the import includes the repository structure and not the actual files.

You can read more about importing GitHub repositories here.

If you use both GitHub and Bintray, this cool new feature will save you time and reduce hassle.
Good Luck!

Catch that Millionth Download with Bintray’s New Statistics API

Want to know exactly how many times your packages have been downloaded? Bintray has always given you download statistics through its UI, but now you can also get them for professional repositories via REST API. Detailed statistics on downloads per version over any time frame give you deep insights into how your software releases are consumed.
If you have never used statistics in Bintray, go ahead and check it out in the user guide.

Let’s see an example
Say I want to get the daily number of downloads of ‘myCoolPackage’ from October 1st to October 8th, 2015. This is what the stats look like in the Bintray UI:

myCoolPackage Downloads UI Stats Per Week

According to the chart, ‘myCoolPackage’ was downloaded a total of 147,752 times in that period. We can clearly see that there were downloads every day; there were dips on October 4th (Sunday) and October 8th (the chart was generated on October 8th around midday), and the most popular versions were 1.1.0 and 1.2.0.

Now you can get all this information programmatically using the new REST API. Here’s the “daily downloads” API as it is described in the REST API documentation:

GET /packages/:subject/:repo/:package/stats/time_range_downloads

To get the statistics displayed in the chart above, I would use the following command:

curl -X GET "https://api.bintray.com/packages/tamarUser/Maven/myCoolPackage/stats/time_range_downloads" -u tamarUser:***my-top-secret-api-key*** -H "content-type:application/json" -d “{\"from\":\"2015-10-01T12:08:56.235z\",\"to\":\"2015-10-08T12:08:56.235z\"}"

I get the following response in JSON format:

{
  "from":"2015-10-01T00:00:00.000Z",
  "to":"2015-10-08T23:59:59.999Z",
  "records":[
      {"date":"2015-10-01","downloads":
        [{"version":"1.0.5","count":1939},
         {"version":"1.1.0","count":6950},
         {"version":"1.1.3","count":293},
         {"version":"1.1.7","count":116},
         {"version":"1.2.0","count":10111},
         {"version":"1.2.1","count":1329},
         {"version":"1.2.2","count":1706}]},
      {"date":"2015-10-02","downloads":
        [{"version":"1.0.5","count":315},
         {"version":"1.1.0","count":6975},
         {"version":"1.1.3","count":198},
         {"version":"1.1.7","count":121},
         {"version":"1.2.0","count":9967},
         {"version":"1.2.1","count":1290},
         {"version":"1.2.2","count":1759}]},
      {"date":"2015-10-03","downloads":
      ...]
}

The response provides all of the same data that Bintray uses to create the chart in the UI. For each day within the requested date range in which downloads occurred, it lists the number of downloads per version. As simple JSON output, you can easily parse the response and use it any way that helps you analyze your package downloads quickly and effectively. You are now able to identify trends in downloads, your popular versions and more.

Other statistics REST APIs include: total downloads and downloads by country. Keep an eye on this blog to hear about new APIs when we add them.

Good luck!

Increase your Maven Package’s Exposure by Adding it to JCenter

If you already distribute your Maven packages via Bintray, your packages can gain further exposure by including them in Bintray’s JCenter! (if you are not very familiar with Bintray’s support for Maven, please refer to the user guide and to my previous post).

JCenter is the repository with the biggest collection of Maven artifacts in the world. And it’s on the best software distribution platform around – Bintray. This is where you want your Maven packages to be! CDN speed, user exposure, and live statistics to monitor the use of your artifacts are some of the benefits you get from JCenter. And if you really want to, you can also have your project synced with the older Maven Central repository.

Submit an Inclusion Request to JCenter

To promote sharing of packages within the developer community, once you have uploaded a package to one of your repositories, you can submit a request to the owner of any other repository to have your package included in theirs. If your request is granted, your package can be found just like any other package in that repository. You still maintain full control over the package in your own repository, and any changes you make to it, such as delivering new versions, or even removing it, are automatically synced to the other repository in which it’s included. So to maximize exposure of your Maven package in Bintray, all you need to do is request to have it added to JCenter.
In order to submit a request, just click on the ‘Add to JCenter’ button:

Add Package To JCenter
Once a Bintray moderator approves your request, your package will be available on JCenter, and you will receive a message into your Bintray mailbox. You will also see that your package is now linked to JCenter:
Maven Projects Linked To JCenter

Sync with Maven Central

At this point you can also have JCenter sync your package to Maven Central if you need to serve frameworks still using this repository. All you need to do is click on the ‘Maven Central’ link as shown above. Remember that you need to provide your Sonatype user name to Bintray before the syncing, but don’t worry, Bintray will remind you to do so if you haven’t already added it to your profile under Accounts:
Accounts Sonatype
Bintray takes care of the rest. Please also refer to the step by step instructions for how to sync your artifacts with Maven Central.

Good luck, and keep your package front and JCenter!

Publishing Your Maven Project to Bintray

Bintray gives you everything you need to share your Maven project, and much more: you will be able to monitor downloads and users with the statistics that Bintray keeps for you. You can also share your project via Bintray’s JCenter repository (which is the largest public Maven repository out there), and effortlessly sync it with Maven Central, if you wish.

Just follow these 5 simple steps to upload your Maven project to Bintray:

1. Have your Maven project ready

  • For this use case we will assume we have a maven project with the following groupId: org.jfrog.example.bintray.maven

2. Create a Maven package in Bintray

  • Open a Bintray account if you have not done so before.
  • Use the default Maven repository under your account or create a new one. The is where your Maven files will be hosted.

Create New Maven Repository

  • Under the Maven repository create a new package for your project. The package is merely a logical container that holds metadata about your project and annotates your files to allow Bintray to collect package and version level statistics.
    A good name for your package would be your main artifactId, but any name that logically identifies your project will do just as well.
    In our case, a good example would be: maven-example

3. Add the Bintray distribution URL

Next thing you need to do is to add a distribution section to your project’s pom.xml, and specify the URL from which to distribute your project. We will use our Bintray Maven repository and package as the target for deployment (remember? files in Bintray are always associated with a logical software package).

<distributionManagement>
  <repository>
      <id>bintray-repo-maven-example</id>
      <url>https://api.bintray.com/maven/tamarjfrog/maven-repo/maven-example/;publish=1</url>
  </repository>
</distributionManagement>

For your project to be visible to others, Bintray requires that you publish it. One way to do that is to add the publish directive to the distribution URL as a matrix parameter (;publish=1) as I did in the above example. You can also publish your projects at a later time using  the Bintray UI or via REST.

This block also includes an <id> tag. The id can be any string, but it should match the id in the settings.xml file described in the next step.

4. Provide your credentials to Bintray

In order to work with Bintray you need to provide your Bintray username and API Key as upload credentials in the username and password tags of your Maven settings.xml file. The API Key can be found when editing your Bintray profile page.

<server>
  <id>bintray-repo-maven-example</id>
  <username>tamarjfrog</username>
  <password>***my-top-secret-api-key***</password>
</server>

5. Time to deploy!

You are almost there. This is the time to run

mvn deploy

The project will be built, uploaded to the the Bintray repository target URL you provided, and published. You can now see your files in your Maven package in Bintray.

Maven Package Files List.
At this point, you can add your project to JCenter, the most comprehensive public Maven repository, so your project is well exposed. To read more about that, stay tuned for my next post.

A sample project similar to what I used in this post can be found in GitHub: bintray-examples/maven-examples.

Good Luck!

Creating a Signed URL Using the Bintray UI

Creating a Signed URL is now available to you through the Bintray friendly User Interface, from start to end.
If you are new to Signed URLs, you would rather check out this cool feature. Refer to the REST API Guide at URL Signing, and to the Sign me up! blog, discussing generating Signed URL using REST APIs.

Signed URLs are great for handing off a link to a single file download. They allow you to provide a link to download a published file from a private repository to a person that is not even a Bintray user! You are still able to track and monitor downloads volume and the identity of the users.

If you want to share a package or repository, or need to have more fine grained permissions control, take a look at Download Keys and Entitlements.

The scope here is files, hence, the option to generate a signed URL is available in the files view, under ‘Actions’:

Generate Signed URL

Once hitting ‘Generate signed URL’, the following form is opened:

Generate Signed URL Scrrenshot

This is where you wish to provide some extra parameters that make the Signed URL even smarter. All parameters are optional, except to the expiry field that is set to 30 minutes by default. The other parameters are described in the REST API guide.
The URL will be generated once you click ‘Create URL’. The file can be downloaded using curl in command line:

curl –X GET “signed URL” > filename.ext

Or just by copying and pasting the Signed URL into your browser.

Creating a Signed URL has never been easier!