Who needs a EULA if nobody reads it?

bintray_eula_products_blogpostAs long as you’re distributing public open source software, you don’t need a EULA. Just choose from the over 100 open source licenses Bintray offers to get the level of protection you want. Once you move to distributing commercial software, you need a EULA. This is the contract that you make with all of your users when they download your software from Bintray. Without a EULA, you’re exposing yourself to lawsuits and unmitigated copying and redistribution.

Now, we’ve all seen EULAs. Whether they’re entitled “Terms of Service”, “Terms and Conditions”, or “Here’s what you can and can’t do with my software”, essentially, they are the same. They usually pop up early on in the installation sequence of any new piece of commercial software we install. And I can tell you, with 5-nines of certainty that most of us just click “Next” without reading them, and complete the installation. But there is a breed of people who actually DO read EULAs. They are usually sequestered in some corporate enclave, and it’s their job to make sure that the company they represent can accept the contractual obligations you set forth in your EULA. Yes, these are the company lawyers. Without their “OK”, your potential enterprise customers will not use your software.

Now, as smart as lawyers may be (or not), if your EULA is hidden somewhere deep under /etc/this/that/and/the/other, it’s going to be difficult to find. There’s no reason to make this difficult. Bintray gives you an easy way to expose your EULA through Products.

Bintray Products and EULAs

Say you developed your “packageOfTheCentury”, and, naturally, you want to offer it to developers on different platforms. I.e., you might have your debianPackageOfTheCentury, nugetPackageOfTheCenutury, npmPackageOfTheCentury…and so on. Since all these packages represent the same product, just for different packaging formats, you will want to apply the same EULA to all of them. This is where Bintray Products come into play. Products are available with a Gold or Enterprise account, and let you collect all the packages under one roof as a single coherent offering, making it easy for you to manage. It’s also easier for potential users to find your single product rather than searching for all its components separately, and any update you make to any of the constituent packages in your product is automatically reflected as a new version of the product itself. But the biggest benefit is that you only need to assign a single EULA to your product, and it applies to all of its constituent packages. And the beauty of it is that your EULA protects your product, for both authenticated and anonymous users, before it’s even downloaded, rather than being embedded inside the packages. That also means that it’s easy to update online as any of the constituent packages are updated with new versions. 

Creating a Product is easy.

NewProduct

 

And once your product is created, and you’ve entered its basic details, it’s easy to add packages to it.

ProductPackages

You don’t even have to change your product’s version manually; it is automatically derived by Bintray any time the version of one its constituent packages changes. And if you really want to, you can assign a different EULA to different versions of your product as needed.You don’t even have to change your product’s version manually; it is automatically derived by Bintray any time the version of one its constituent packages changes. And if you really want to, you can assign a different EULA to different versions of your product as needed.

Product Versions

 

All About Bintray EULAs

With a Bintray Enterprise account, you can manage all of your EULAs in one place and set a default EULA to be assigned to all new versions of this product that are created.

ProductEULAs

You can create a new EULA at any time using Asciidoc, Markdown or free text.

Create a New EULA

And once you have a EULA assigned to your product, if anyone (even an anonymous user) tries to download a file from one of the packages in your product, they will have to accept your EULA first. In fact, the download URL provided by Bintray for any of the packages in your product will first pop up the EULA and require the user to accept before proceeding with download. That means you can provide a EULA-protected download link from any other app. Just hover over the package in your download list to see it.

Download URL with EULA

 

Why don’t you try this one to see how it works. Here’s what you should see.

Accept EULA

 

By collecting the different packages you are offering under a single product, governed by a single EULA, you’re protecting your interests, making things simpler, and reducing your (and your customers’) legal costs. Can you think of any better way to protect your IP and keep both your lawyers and your customers happy?

Read all about managing products and EULAs.

 

 

Increase your Maven Package’s Exposure by Adding it to JCenter

If you already distribute your Maven packages via Bintray, your packages can gain further exposure by including them in Bintray’s JCenter! (if you are not very familiar with Bintray’s support for Maven, please refer to the user guide and to my previous post).

JCenter is the repository with the biggest collection of Maven artifacts in the world. And it’s on the best software distribution platform around – Bintray. This is where you want your Maven packages to be! CDN speed, user exposure, and live statistics to monitor the use of your artifacts are some of the benefits you get from JCenter. And if you really want to, you can also have your project synced with the older Maven Central repository.

Submit an Inclusion Request to JCenter

To promote sharing of packages within the developer community, once you have uploaded a package to one of your repositories, you can submit a request to the owner of any other repository to have your package included in theirs. If your request is granted, your package can be found just like any other package in that repository. You still maintain full control over the package in your own repository, and any changes you make to it, such as delivering new versions, or even removing it, are automatically synced to the other repository in which it’s included. So to maximize exposure of your Maven package in Bintray, all you need to do is request to have it added to JCenter.
In order to submit a request, just click on the ‘Add to JCenter’ button:

Add Package To JCenter
Once a Bintray moderator approves your request, your package will be available on JCenter, and you will receive a message into your Bintray mailbox. You will also see that your package is now linked to JCenter:
Maven Projects Linked To JCenter

Sync with Maven Central

At this point you can also have JCenter sync your package to Maven Central if you need to serve frameworks still using this repository. All you need to do is click on the ‘Maven Central’ link as shown above. Remember that you need to provide your Sonatype user name to Bintray before the syncing, but don’t worry, Bintray will remind you to do so if you haven’t already added it to your profile under Accounts:
Accounts Sonatype
Bintray takes care of the rest. Please also refer to the step by step instructions for how to sync your artifacts with Maven Central.

Good luck, and keep your package front and JCenter!

Creating a Signed URL Using the Bintray UI

Creating a Signed URL is now available to you through the Bintray friendly User Interface, from start to end.
If you are new to Signed URLs, you would rather check out this cool feature. Refer to the REST API Guide at URL Signing, and to the Sign me up! blog, discussing generating Signed URL using REST APIs.

Signed URLs are great for handing off a link to a single file download. They allow you to provide a link to download a published file from a private repository to a person that is not even a Bintray user! You are still able to track and monitor downloads volume and the identity of the users.

If you want to share a package or repository, or need to have more fine grained permissions control, take a look at Download Keys and Entitlements.

The scope here is files, hence, the option to generate a signed URL is available in the files view, under ‘Actions’:

Generate Signed URL

Once hitting ‘Generate signed URL’, the following form is opened:

Generate Signed URL Scrrenshot

This is where you wish to provide some extra parameters that make the Signed URL even smarter. All parameters are optional, except to the expiry field that is set to 30 minutes by default. The other parameters are described in the REST API guide.
The URL will be generated once you click ‘Create URL’. The file can be downloaded using curl in command line:

curl –X GET “signed URL” > filename.ext

Or just by copying and pasting the Signed URL into your browser.

Creating a Signed URL has never been easier!

Even more Vagrant love in Bintray

You, of course, know, that for nearly the last two years, you have been downloading your Vagrant software from JFrog Bintray. But recently, Bintray has taken Vagrant support to a whole new level; it is now is a fully fledged Vagrant repository allowing you to distribute your public and private Vagrant boxes from Bintray! As for everything in Bintray, it’s simple and powerful:

Publishing Vagrant Boxes

1. Create a Vagrant repository (if you’re a new user it is likely that you already have a default Vagrant repository named “boxes”):

Create a Vagrant repository

2. Click on “Set Me Up!” and copy/paste the REST command to upload the boxes:

Create a Vagrant repository

Consuming Vagrant Boxes

Follow the “Downloading” section under “Set Me Up!” to configure box resolution for downloading Vagrant boxes, and be able to enjoy automatic box update during ‘vagrant up’ a box either by an explicit call to  ‘vagrant box update’. That’s it, now you can benefit from all the power behind Bintray distribution: CDN, stats, logs, version notifications and more. So give it a try, put a box or two on JFrog Bintray today!

Download stats and logs – now with deep user insights

Ever wondered who exactly downloaded your software? I don’t mean just “someone from the United States.” I’m talking about getting down to the organization level in terms of “someone from Acme Corp. NY office”.

Now you can get this information, from Bintray:
Bintray Live Download Feed

This information is available for any package type for Bintray Premium users, but that’s not all. It is also available, for free, for every OSS package in JCenter!!! This means that if you own a package that is linked to JCenter you already have this information available today!

And not only can you get rich live logs of your downloads, you can retrieve fully parsable logs in CSV or Apache common format! Just use the REST API, or click the preferred log format link:
Bintray Download Logs

Log format options include the Apache-style logs, which can be analyzed by dozens of tools out there, or you can download the logs as CSV files. CSV files are usually easier to understand, and actually contain more data, such as ZIP code, geolocation etc. Download the CSV log and hack on! Or, you can even open it in Excel and show it to your boss:
Bintray Logs in CSV Format
Excel jokes aside, that’s the most powerful downloads analytics one can get and it’s there at your fingertips.

With Live Logs and Download Logs you get much more detail about activity within your repositories. This can be very helpful in analyzing peaks as it provides immediate feedback on the popularity of your software, and how this popularity is distributed by version, geo-location and organization. Naturally, it can also be used to direct you to where you should be focusing your marketing efforts.

It’s time to learn about your users!

Another one bites the Maven Central dust (and saved by Bintray)

Today, I encountered another very detailed blog post on the woes of publishing on Maven Central. Jose Maria Arranz (@jmarranz) explains why he doesn’t like Maven in general and publishing to Maven Central in particular (I am with him on a lot of valid points).

I can’t help quoting:

Fortunately when searching for how-to articles and commenting in Twitter, @jbaruch an employee of JFrog contacts with me offering Bintray.com alternative to publish to Maven Central, the people behind JCenter, I read the article “The easy way to maven central” and I was sold. Bintray provides a GUI to upload and self sign your artifacts if you provides your public and private GnuPG keys, and with a simple UI action you are published in JCenter repository, and providing the Sontaype user and password you can finally easily publish in Maven Central.

Bintray helped me to break the wall of Sonatype process. I’m saved!!

Currently I’ve released RelProxy on JCenter and Maven Central. For releasing I use Ant calling to Maven tasks to generate the required Maven artifacts and to generate a distribution zip with everything. Everything could be automated, I could add signing and uploading from Ant (or maybe by the POM) without Bintray, but Bintray auto-signing and uploading UI is enough for me, releasing is done from time to time and most of releasing process is already automated, and releasing in JCenter is a plus.

Note: Don’t forget JCenter, for instance Maven Central is no longer pre-configured in Google Android environment.

That’s what I call “success”!

Thanks for the kind words, Jose Maria! I am happy that we managed to help 🙂