Nodeclipse: 500k downloads per month and counting!

Paul Verest

Paul Verest

Paul Verest, the Nodeclipse project lead posted to the Nodeclipse blog about his experiences with Bintray.

He talks about how the Bintray distribution platform freed up resources to take care of the truly important things – driving Nodeclipse and Enide Studio forward!

The main benefits Paul mentions are:

  • Speed – almost 3 times faster than GitHub and more than 5 times faster than SourceForge!
  • Eclipse Plugins Update Site (P2) Support –  allows users to define a unified Eclipse Update Site for a bunch of Nodeclipse related plugins (with a single URL that always points to the latest versions)
  • Simple UI – simplifies the release process for the Nodeclipse team
  • Additional small perks – flexible statistics and new release notifications.

Read on the original article on the Nodecipse site and join the discussion.

Enjoy Bintray and use it as pain-free gateway to Maven Central

What does it means when some tool or framework has literally dozens of guides, pages long each?maven central dinosaur
It probably means that it is popular, or complicated to use. Usually, both.

That’s the story of Maven Central (a.k.a. Central Repository, a.k.a. repo1, a.k.a. ibiblio). Of course, there is a better alternative nowadays – Bintray is already a super-set of Maven Central, both in terms of UI, UX and content, but Maven Central is still “hardwired” into the super-popular Maven 2. As such, it is being used by many – by Maven users of course, but also by Ivy, and even by Gradle users (those not familiar with Bintray’s ‘jcenter()’ repo yet). That means that you (still) want your package to also end up  there.

But getting it there is painful… *Very* painful.

Maven Central #fail

Click to enjoy the comments 😛

To understand how painful, next time you take a break, here’s a nice old-school text quest.

So, you get the picture. There has to be a better way. Indeed there is. Why don’t you use a proper distribution platform, with easy and intuitive on-boarding, publishing and sharing, with rich near real-time statistics, downloadable logs, packages inclusion, watching and sharing abilities, and much more. You know, Bintray.

Here’s the deal:

First, some simple one-time setup needed to be done.

  1. Register to Bintray and set up auto-signing: Generate yourself a keypair, if you don’t have one. Add it to your profile, and setup your default Maven repo (or a new one) for signing with your GPG key: Bintray can then sign your jars automatically.
  2. Add your Sonatype account under “accounts”. If you don’t have one, follow this procedure (yeah, we know what you are saying when you see it, that’s the last “wtf” in this guide, we promise).
  3. Create and link your package: Import from a GitHub repo or create a new package for your Maven project (multi-module projects can map to a single package). Click on “Add to JCenter” to get your package linked to the largest Java Maven repository on the planet.
  4. Set up Maven up to deploy to Bintray by copy-pasting the pom.xml snippets from “Set me up!” guide, or use the bintray-gradle-plugin.

Now, for each release, it’s easy as 1-2-3:

  1. Deploy: Deploy files to Bintray by running your build tool*.
  2. Publish: Review the build artifacts in Bintray and publish the version files if satisfied. Don’t forget to advertise your new release using a single-click tweet.
  3. Sync: On the version page go to the Maven Central tab (the one with the dinosaur icon on it), enter your Sonatype password and click “Sync” and you’re done! Your package is now in https://oss.sonatype.org/content/repositories/releases and will be synced to Maven Central (and they usually take their time). In case of a sync problem, Bintray will automatically take care of any needed cleanup.

Next, you’ll probably feel the urge to to tweet something like this:

Don’t resist it. You are joining spring, netty, jenkins, joda-time, asciidoctor and many many others that already feel the same way.


* Remember: distribution platform is not for SNAPSHOT-s. Stay tuned for our post about oss.jfrog.org to see how you can get access to a free binary repository with one-click promotion to Bintray.

Tracking New Java Libraries Has Never Been Easier!

Want to know when a new version of $YourFavoriteJavaLibrary is released (and I mean – any Java library)? With Bintray, it’s one-two-three.

  1. Go to bintray.com and search.

    Search Bintray

    Click to enlarge

  2. Click on the package you’d like to watch.

    Bintray Smart Sorting

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  3. Click “watch”, (log in if needed).

    Bintray Watch Package

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  4. Done.
  5. Watch your mailbox, you’ll get an email.

    Bintray Email Notification

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It can’t be simpler than this, can it? 🙂

P.S. Of course, this functionality is not limited to Java packages only. Any binary in Bintray can be watched for new versions.

Stay in Context, See the World

New release, new features!

Focus on what’s important

You know, Bintray supports various repository types, like Maven, YUM and Debs, and more types to come. But sometimes all those goodies are just too much. You want to see and search for only certain type of packages (e.g. focus only on Maven jars to use Bintray as Maven repository). Now you can scope the whole Bintray experience to a single repository type:
select context

And woot! You are in the Java world, completely. Nothing but your beloved jars:
maven context
The selection is persistent, and you can always clear it by clicking the x on the filter button.

See where your fans are

I know I usually write too much, so this one will be image only:
map

Nuff said.

Happy publishing!